Top 10 Christmas Markets in Germany

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas!

The enchanting smells of roasted almonds and chestnuts mulled wine, and rum punch fills the air.  Hot chocolate, potato pancakes, and candied apples. Wooden Christmas ornaments and crystal angels.

It’s all over Germany filled with festive decored huts, selling handcrafted goods, and delicious food.

Everything is decorated for Christmas with trees and lights and invites you to enjoy traditional Christmas in the various city centers which bring much-needed joy and cheer.

Experience this one-of-a-kind atmosphere and enjoy the magic of the traditional German Christmas Markets popular among the locals and tourists as well!

1. Römerberg, Frankfurt Christmas Market

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Photo Credit to frankfurt.capribyfraser.com

The market stalls are set in the midst of the area’s timber farmed houses, constructing with the glitzy high-rises of the financial district in the background. As one of Germany’s oldest markets, the market at Römerberg is a sure-fire way to enjoy some traditional goodies and Christmas spirit. Handmade trinkets and crafts make for fantastic souvenirs and gifts, and the local culinary specials – from hot apple wine to Bethmännchen marzipan cookies – will give you the full Franconian experience.

2. Weihnachtsmarkt Am Kölner Dom, Cologne Christmas Market

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Photo Credit to blog.sonnenklar.tv

Cologne’s most famous Christmas Market is situated at the foot of the city’s most prominent landmark and UNESCO World Heritage site, the Gothic Cathedral. The aroma of baked apples, cinnamon biscuits, and mulled wine will waft through the alleys, and many differently themed Christmas markets will invite people to stroll, shop, listen to the live music, and explore. The festival centers around an enormous Christmas tree decorated with lights, red ribbons, and ornaments.

3. Striezelmarkt, Dresden Christmas Market

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Photo Credit to mydiscoveries.com.au

With a blaze of lights glittering over the river, a thick scent of mulled wine in the air, the sound of festive music, and the twirling of carousels, Dresden Steriezelmarkt set the atmosphere for a Christmas cheer. The oldest Christmas market in Germany offers traditional handcrafted nutcrackers that are favorites at the market, as well as the Dresden Pflaumentoffel – a small chimney sweep made out of dates. Aside from miniature statues, visitors can indulge in Germany’s classic stollen fruit loaf.

4. Gendarmenmarkt, Berlin Christmas Market

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Photo Credit to mydiscoveries.com.au

This lovely Christmas Market takes place at the famous square, in front of the stunning German and French cathedrals and the former Royal Theater. Undoubtedly one of the most beautiful squares in Berlin. Widely regarded as the capital of Christmas markets, the city boasts an incredible variety of fairs, where artists, jewelers, and musicians lure visitors into a wonderful atmosphere.

 5. Weihnachtsmarkt, Leipzig Christmas Market

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Photo Credit to leipzig.travel

Leipzig prides itself on the second oldest Christmas market in Germany, a tradition that dates back to 1458. Located in front of the Old Town Hall, in the city’s historic center, Leipziger Weihnachtsmarkt greets visitors with over 250 glowing stalls full of fascinating holiday gifts and delicious foods. It is a magical place bursting with culture, history, and traditions, where the festive atmosphere is maintained by trumpet fanfares and Christmas concerts.

6. Trier Christmas Market

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Photo Credit to pinterest.com

Set on the medieval Main Market and in front of the imposing backdrop of Trier Cathedral, the 95 attractively decorated booths offer a fitting framework for this wonderful event. The program is for the entire family and changes almost daily – from historical puppet theater to star tenor and songsmiths. The Trier Christmas Market is often described by travel organizers as being romantic with a wonderful ambiance.

7. Christkindlesmarkt, Nuremberg Christmas Market

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Photo Credit to wanderlust.co.uk

The Nuremberg market stands out in terms of history, lore, and tradition. Though its direct origins are murky, historians believe it began during the early 17th century. The market is opened by the Nuremberg Christkind, who reads a poem on the balcony of the Frauenkirche. The unique souvenirs on sale include specialties from the Franconian region, such as brandies, fruit jams, and clothes made from local wool.

8. Ob Der Tauber, Rothenburg Christmas Market

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Photo Credit to travelwithkally.blogspot.com

For a truly immersive experience, head to Rothenburg ob der Tauber in Bavaria, a quaint village where you feel as if you are stepping back in time. This picturesque place draws tourists every year during the Christmas season, as the gabled roofs and cobblestone streets are dusted with snow and illuminated by twinkling Christmas lights. The entire town takes on a festive spirit as residents decorate their windows with garlands.

 9. Ravennaschlucht Christmas Market

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Photo Credit to globalstorybook.org

The Christmas market in the Ravenna gorge combines a romantic and wild atmosphere with the Black Forest. Just below the Höllentalbahn railway viaduct – “Hell Valley Train”, the market is illuminated by lights dancing on the stones of the viaduct, as well as fires around which everyone enjoys warming up. Visit to taste and enjoy the local mulled wine and the Christmas delicacies that accompany it. Local craftsmen will introduce you to their work and fine Black Forest specialties and present you with beautiful holiday gift ideas.

10. Stuttgart Christmas Market

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Photo Credit to pixels.com

the city’s five major squares are transformed each year to bring visitors a taste of some of the country’s longest-standing Christmas bazaars. Some even say that Stuttgart itself is a Christmas city, thanks to its cobblestone streets and myriad historic buildings. The main market worth visiting is the one situated in front of the striking Old Palace, known as Wintertraum Markt. Munch on roasted chestnuts and Lebkuchen (heart-shaped gingerbread cookie) as you get lost in a sea of wooden chalets adorned with festive decorations.

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    2 Responses

    1. German Christmas Markets are not called Christkindlesmarkt. We call it Weihnachtsmarkt. Only a few Christmas Markets are called Christkindlmarkt for example the famous one in Nüremberg or other bavarian cities.

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